DIY Yard Yahtzee Dice

 

DIY When it’s not blazing hot outside my family loves to be outside playing and enjoying our patio. But we live in Texas so we get a very small window of time in the evenings where we don’t almost choke on the heat when we go outside. We just recently had a “cold front” move through that brought the temperature from highs in the 100s to highs in the mid 80’s and it feels awesome! Talk about desperate, eh? Eighty feels like the cool chill of fall around here. *insert rolling eyes emoji*

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Now that it’s bearable to be outside again, for the most part, we love having games and other fun things to do. I recently made these giant dice so we could play yard Yahtzee and they have been so much fun! Izzy thinks they’re just about the coolest thing ever and she is always on a “team” with either Tyler or I and helps us roll the dice.

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I used to think Yahtzee was just about the lamest game in existence, but my husband absolutely loves it. And there’s just something about taking a game, making it extra large and taking it outdoors that ups the cool factor.

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So, I thought this would be a fun project to surprise him with but it wasn’t much of a surprise after all. I had to ask him to show me how to use his dremel and once he saw me boring holes into the cubes, he figured it out. Shoot. I’ll have to surprise him some other time!

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I had so much fun making these and we really enjoy getting outside and having a cutthroat friendly game with each other. We are so competitive, I feel bad for my kids. I hope they don’t turn out to be big babies like their mom and dad when it comes to gaming! Honestly though, we’re getting better. 😉

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Supplies

  • 4″ x 4″ wood post or these wooden blocks
  • Square layout tool
  • Pencil
  • Measuring tape
  • Skilsaw
  • Safety Glasses
  • Hand saw
  • Sandpaper or Orbiting Sander
  • Dremel tool
  • Wood stain and/or paint
Directions

If you are cutting your own blocks follow these directions:

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  1. Begin by measuring 3 1/2 inches from the end of the post using your square to get a perfectly straight line. Mark on all sides with your pencil. (Even though they are sold as 4″ x 4″ they are 3 1/2 inches wide.)

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2. Cut five blocks using a Skilsaw. The blade wasn’t big enough to completely cut through the block so I cut through as far as I could on one side, flipped over the post 180° and cut again.

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3. Finish cutting using hand saw.

4. With your orbital sander or sandpaper sand down all the edges and corners until smooth.

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5. Before boring out the holes I traced the dots using a small magnet.

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6. Begin boring out the dots with a dremel tool or paint the dots on, which is a lot faster. I used an actual die as reference for where the dots needed to be placed, because I’m so Type A that I have to have it just right.

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7. Stain the blocks or paint them your desired color. Paint the dots as well. I used Minwax stain in Jacobean.

If you purchase wooden blocks follow these directions:

  1. Sand edges if desired.
  2. Begin boring out the dots with a dremel tool or paint the dots on.
  3. Stain or paint the blocks your desired color. Paint the dots.

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Mine are not quite square as I realized a bit too late that those tricksy 4 x 4’s are not exactly 4 inches…Tricksters. I like how it adds to the overall effect of the dice though. They’re pretty rough hewn and a bit rustic and worn looking, which I think gives them some added charm.

Have fun!

 

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